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Listening to stroke survivors

User AvatarPosted by Paul Davey at 12/11/2015 15:55:26

The Kent and Medway Stroke Review

The clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in Kent and Medway are currently reviewing local stroke services. In particular, we are looking at the 72 hours after a person has their first stroke symptoms. We want to see:

  • More patients survive with less disability and better long-term quality of life
  • All patients receiving the highest level of care consistently seven days a week
  • Kent and Medway stroke services secured to a high standard for 10-15 years.

Research has shown that speedy access to diagnosis, specialist treatment and stroke units improves survival and recovery.

Listening to stroke survivors

In July, we held a series of 10 listening events when stroke survivors, their families and their carers were invited to share their experiences of having a stroke or a transient ischaemic attack (TIA – a mini-stroke) and the immediate treatment afterwards. 


Survey


In October we ran a survey for anyone who had experience of local stroke services. In total, 285 people completed it. The full report will be available soon but, in summary, people said that:

The most important things when a stroke or TIA first happens are:

  • Fast ambulance response
  • Getting quick diagnosis and treatment

The most important things relating to the hospital stay are:

  • Specialist care
  • Being treated with respect and dignity

The most important things relating to the staff are:

  • That staff knew my case, treatment and care plan
  • That staff treated me as a person not just a patient

The things of most importance after discharge are:

  • Physical rehabilitation information and exercises
  • Follow up visits from nurses to check on progress

Progress


During September and October, 11 focus groups were organised in Kent and Medway by the Stroke Association or independent stroke groups to enable the NHS to listen to the experiences and hear the views of people affected by stroke, their families and volunteers working with stroke groups.

We also attended a focus group in Bromley and received a report from east Sussex, based on interviews with 20 people carried out by the Stroke Association.  

Full reports will be available soon but, in summary, people in Kent and Medway said:

The most important things when a stroke or TIA first happens are:

  • Fast ambulance response
  • Quick diagnosis and treatment
  • Getting swift access to specialist support was equal with being admitted to a specialist unit.

The most important things relating to the hospital stay are:

  • Being treated with dignity and respect
  • Specialist care
  • Clear information and support to understand my treatment

The most important things relating to the staff are:

  • That staff treated me as a person not just a patient
  • That staff knew my case, treatment and care plan.
  • That staff respond as quickly during the night as during the day

We are also working with voluntary and community organisations that support people from black and minority ethnic communities and others whose specific needs will be considered within the overall plan to ensure their views are heard.  

In November and December, the review is holding three “deliberative events” when panels of the public, stroke survivors and carers, and community representatives, including voluntary organisations, will review the case for change, possible options for the future, and the criteria that should be used in taking decisions on options. The panels have been carefully recruited to ensure they are a representative mix of people from different communities and locations.